Rain, Rain Go Away..

Watching the rain come down and knowing that our system can only handle so much I find myself hoping it would stop soon. Knowing that with just enough rain to put the system over the top our basements could start flooding is no way for any of us to have to live. Is this how it’s going to be every time it rains? I would like to place blame on the Mayor, but this is not his doing. To be fair at least he’s come out and told all of us what is going on in the city. We can expect more flooding more law suites and yes for sure water rates to go up and up, and maybe even a special tax just for this. The council back in February or March voted to raise the water rates with the exception of Councilwoman Horvath who voted NO. We can all look to having it done again I’m sure, but to what end when will it become to expensive to wash our clothes, or take a shower let alone water the lawn and flowers.

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6 thoughts on “Rain, Rain Go Away..”

  1. Wow. Someone that actually takes responsibility for themselves. That’s rare these days. Everybody wants to blame someone else. Excellent post, DH residence!!!

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  2. I’d rather see the City’s money go for insurance than get shoveled up a lawyer’s behind. At lteast insurance buys something constructive.

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  3. Isnt’ that the arguement with national healthcare. you can’t mandate people to buy consumer goods such as insurance. If you give a lower rate to those who have insurance you have have a conflict.

    How about the gov’t is not responsible for personal residences. We each bought our property – had the legal right and responsability to investigate insurance and such and therefore are responsible for it.

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  4. Having been in this fight of the flooded basements since 1965 and attending numerous meetings for the past 47 years there are three main reasons we in the south end continue to have flooded basements. I can’t speak for the north end because they are on the Rouge River System while the south end is on the Ecorse Creek System. Kathy, I am not sure how much I am allowed to post so I will make this a three-installment post.

    First Installment of Why We Have Flooded Basements.
    We have to go way back to the 1800’s. What is now south Dearborn Heights was mainly forest and meadowland. Our neighbor to the south, Taylor, was farmland. When the Ecorse Creek would flood over it would affect the farmland in Taylor. The farmers went to the State of Michigan and had what is now south Dearborn Heights declared a flood zone, so that way they could divert the water of the Ecorse Creek to the north of the Ecorse Creek to prevent their farms from flooding. Even way back then it was illegal for one area to divert water to another area. However, since south Dearborn Heights contained no farmland or residents they were given their request.

    The developers of south Dearborn Heights in the late 40’s and 50’s either didn’t know about the above or didn’t care and houses were built. However, by the 60’s flooded basements began to become a real problem. The City of Dearborn Heights felt that since the Ecorse Creek was in our city we should have control over it. Gates were built along the creek on Monroe, Beech Daly and I believe Pelham. Remnants of these gates can still be seen where the creek goes under Monroe. These gates held back the water from Taylor’s newly built storm water system if we had a heavy rain. The residents of Taylor had to pay several thousand dollars each to have this new storm water system put in, which many residents in Taylor did not want in the first place.

    Then the rains came, Dearborn Heights had minimum flooding but Taylor was drowned because the gates were closed and their water had nowhere else to go except into their basements. The residents of Taylor were madder than hell because they had to pay for a storm sewer system most did not want and now their basements were flooded. A few resourceful Taylor residents decided to do some digging and found out about south Dearborn Heights being declared a flood zone in the 1800’s. However, the most important fact was when Dearborn Heights was being built no one bothered to petition the state to remove the flood zone status and therefore Taylor sued Dearborn Heights and won. The gates were removed and water from Taylor was now free to flow into the Ecorse Creek, which was already over burdened with water from new developing cities to the west and the airport. As time went on and more municipalities diverted their storm water into the Ecorse Creek, even with the gates open Taylor suffered flooded basements along with Dearborn Heights.

    You see, if that status had been removed when Dearborn Heights was being developed the airport and the cities to our west would have never been able to divert their water into the Ecorse Creek because is illegal for any municipality to dump their storm run-off on another. They would have had to find another system rather than the Ecorse Creek to get rid of their storm water. However, when the problem was discovered it was too late for us because it was Dearborn Heights against the airport and other cities and we could not reverse the flood zone status. Instead, many residents in Dearborn Heights now have to pay expensive flood insurance. Dearborn Heights has fought this thing for decades but its just little us against so many others who would have to pay millions of dollars to find another source other than the Ecorse Creek to dump their water into.

    Second Installment coming soon.

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  5. Let’s make sure they don’t even THINK about raising the water rates to cover what they “borrowed” from the water fund. (Remember, it’s supposed to be paid back with interest before September 1.)

    [To help avoid lawsuits, why dosn’t the City offer a property tax credit to cover the cost of Backup Insurance and Flood Insurance for any citizen who buys it?]

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