Information from the Dearborn Heights Police Contract.

I have gotten all the information so far for the police contracts. I would like to say this from the start. I do not know if some of what they are getting is standard. After reading I tend to think some of these benefits are not standard. Do I think our police force should be well paid yes. Do I think that they should be making more when they retire then they did when they where working for the city NO. In an effort to understand why they would be getting more I decided to read the contract to help all of us understand what is going on.

How many officers were in DROP before arbitration seven (7) and after arbitration 22 officers have signed up.

  • Compensatory time may be used to pay for health insurance co-pays provided same is paid in full at one time.
  • Compensatory hours in excess of 240 maybe converted to furlough time up to (48) hours/ 6 full days eight hour shift or 4 full days twelve hour shift.
  • Compensatory hours in excess of 240 hours maybe converted to sick time (1800 hours/225 day maximum)
  • Effective july 1 2009 and current employee is also permitted to purchase a combined maximum of up to (60) months service credits. The cost per employee shall be five percent (5%) of employees base wage as provided in article 16 for the first (48) months
  • 16.3 Longevity pay police officers will be paid longevity.
  • Article XVII uniform allowance 2% of that employees base wage payable on or before the 30th day of June annually.
  • An officer can accumulate up to 240 hours compensatory time.
  • Court time if an officer has to appear in court other than such officers regular time they will be paid time and half.
  • An officer may bank up to 240 hours vacation time to be used for determining the employees final average compensation.
  • The city gives each officer 1 sick day each month that is 12 extra sick days a year.

These are just a few of the things I thought you might find interesting. Most of these things can be put in their DROP or pension including their uniform allowance. Interesting thing use to be the highest 3 years out of 10 years to calculate their pension. They now can use the highest 3 out of all the years they are on the force. That is a huge difference, and the possibilities are far reaching.

I will keep reading and post what else I find out.

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9 thoughts on “Information from the Dearborn Heights Police Contract.”

  1. Tim

    Thank you so much for all the information this is just what we need here. It is so nice to see someone take an interest and spend some time gathering information. I would like if each of you to click on the links and read these articles. Great work Tim…

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  2. Private,

    I see that you have not done your homework. Let me correct a few of your inaccuracies:

    1. “they work for little pay especially for a college grad” – I don’t know if it’s required now, but the officers that are now entering the DROP were not required to have a college degree.
    2. “John Riley was very misleading in his statement” – he was quoting actual DROP figures. I’m not sure how that’s misleading.
    3. “work holidays and weekends” – they also get a bonus holiday pay, which is quite substantial.
    4. “their pensions have not affected our taxes in at least 25 years” – you better take a look at your summer tax bill. The city millage went up specifically for the police and fire pension.
    5. “The pension is now overfunded” – yes, because of excellent investing by the city Treasurer. But, it will not be once they start collecting.
    6. Their “life expectancy is 7 years beyond retirement” – I’d really like to see where you got this information. Please post a link. This is what I found. http://davisvanguard.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2977:calpers-debunks-myth-of-shorter-life-expectancy-for-safety-employees&Itemid=79

    Finally, you say that you have read articles on the DROP and everything that you read shows that it is a good program for everyone involved. Please post these articles that you have read. Philadelphia doesn’t seem to agree. Here are a few of my own to the contrary:

    http://whyy.org/blogs/itsourcity/2009/06/15/in-philadelphia-its-drop-in-other-places-its-called-a-sham-retirement/
    http://www.philly.com/inquirer/local/pa/20100804_Mayor_Nutter_tells_Philadelphia_City_Council_to_drop_DROP.html
    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/breaking/20100803_DROP_program_has_cost_city_an_extra__258_million.html

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  3. drheights48127,
    Due to government rules not everyone working for the city is entitled to the drop program. From what I have read I know that police, fire and teachers are eligible.

    Tim,
    If you wanted the $6,000 pension, work for 25 years and retire at age 45 I guess that you should have went to school for police or fire and joined the department. Just remember they work for little pay especially for a college grad, work holidays and weekends, 25 years of stressful work, and life expectancy is 7 years beyond retirement. I have looked the contract over and have read articles on the drop and everything that I have read shows that it is a good program for everyone involved. I watched the council meeting on cable and John Riley was very misleading in his statement. I am not totally for the police and fire, but their pensions have not effected are taxes in at least 25 years. Police and fire contribute to the pension system and the drop is a good program for the pension and in today’s market it has been earning the pension system interest and the pension is now overfunded.

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  4. Private, you may want to check what other city employees have been forced to give up and have received nothing before you start defending the police officers. It was definitely not a “major reduction” in health care, as you say. When the treasurer of the city is against this contract, there is something really really wrong! As for what Anxious said about these officers not living in the city, do you not realize that it is your tax dollars that is paying their huge pension? I’d sure like to bring home $6,000+ a month for only working 25 years and be able to retire at the age of 45.

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  5. Private
    Thank you for coming to the blog, I have not finished reading the contract, but you are right. They have gone with out a raise for several years. They did take a hit in the health care portion. I did not hear that the fire department received raises thank you for letting all of us know that. Yes the police officers pay into the pension system. The contract that they have now is good until 2013. Question for everyone if the DROP is so good for the city why not offer it to everyone who works for the city? What would be the draw backs to that, and what would be the good in it. Let me know what you think I will try to finish today reading and putting up more information about the contract. If I understand right the fire dept will be doing their contract negotiations soon.

    Just to let you know one more thing the Police are not the only ones taking the (health care hit) every employee of the city is taking the hit. Including the other union workers who from all indications will be signing off on it also. The savings for the city was not just with the police contract. That contract was key and the agreement by the police to take the hit was crucial. The city needed them to get on board with the health care hit to make sure all the rest would follow.

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  6. You only post what the police officers received, but not what they had to give up…I understand that they have gone without any type of raise for several years and are taking a major reduction in health care benefits even after the fire department received raises. From what I have read the police officers pay into the pension system and the drop is actually good for the city and the pension system.

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  7. No wonder people are moving out of Dearborn Heights. They think our social secruity is going to pay for this when the government hasen’t given us a raise in 2 years. I hope all that money makes them a little more friendly.

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